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"Living in Hope"
Living in Hope single.jpg
US picture sleeve

A-side

Scrambled Eggs

Released

6 August 1965 (UK)
13 September 1965 (US)

Recorded

17 June 1965

Genre

Country rock, rockabilly

Label

Capatol

Songwriter(s)

Nasty-McQuickly

Producer(s)

Archie Macaw

Last single

Ouch! (1965) (US)
Let It Rot (1970) (UK)

Next single

Gay Tripper (1965) (US)
We've Arrived! (And to Prove It We're Here) (1976) (UK)

The_Rutles_-_Living_In_Hope

The Rutles - Living In Hope

Living in Hope is a country song by The Rutles, written and sung by drummer Barry Wom. It is one of Barry's most recognizable songs, and would go down as a key moment in his life. The EP can be seen in the music video for "ENOUGH!," along with albums such as "Barry Cross The Mersey" and the general Rutles discography.

The song was performed live at Barry's wedding, in February 11, 1965. Later that day, he accidentally married the wrong girl and ended up seeing the right one in the arms of some Scotsman from Hull. A memory that would later inspire his first solo album.

Background[]

Wom first played his song for the other Rutles soon after he joined the group in August 1962. During an interview, Wom commented on the songwriting process, saying: "I wrote Living in Hope when I was sitting round at home. I was fiddling with the piano – I just bang away – and then if a melody comes and some words, I just have to keep going. It was great to get my first song down, one that I had written. It was a very exciting time for me and everyone was really helpful, and recording that crazy violinist was a thrilling moment."

The earliest public mention of the track seems to have been in a BBC chatter session introducing "Between Us" on the radio show Top Gear in 1964. In the conversation, Wom was asked if he had written a song and Dirk McQuickly mocked him soon afterwards, singing the first line of the refrain, "I'm Living in Hope, Living in Hope, Living in Hope, Living in Hope"

Releases and covers[]

External links[]

  • Information on this topic is possible thanks to Rutle historian Micheal Livesley, whose website can be found here: [1]
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